Homemade “Meat”, “Cheese”, and Bread and how much do they cost

Artwork by The Child

I just finished eating a delicious “meat” and “cheese” sandwich on homemade bread and I thought I should share some amazingly easy recipes together with a comparison of the cost to make them at home verses buying equivalent products. Although the savings are significant, I mostly cook because I enjoy the magic of creating food (who knew you can make “meat” in your kitchen with just a few minutes of labor), and I like having control over the ingredients I use. Buying in bulk and cooking from scratch also reduces waste from packaging.

We are mostly vegan, hence the quotes above, but I am still pretty traditional and like a good “meat” and “cheese” sandwich once in a while. Bread is one of the easiest things to make and it is well worth making it at home to avoid all the preservatives added to store-bought breads. Plus it makes your house smell great.

I don’t remember where I got my bread recipe so I can’t give proper credit, sorry.

Bread

(This recipe is very forgiving. Even though I give exact measurements, I only measure the flour and the water and I am not very careful with those.)

Dry Ingredients
4 cups white flour
(can replace 1 cup with whole
wheat)
2.5 teaspoons yeast
1.5 teaspoons salt
Wet Ingredients
2 Tablespoons oil
1 3/4 cup warm water

In a big bowl mix together the dry ingredients. Then add the wet ingredients. Mix and knead for a couple of minutes. Add more flour if needed. Let the dough sit in the bowl covered with a damp towel for about 2 hours. It will double in size. I make two loaves out of it. After forming the loaves, give them another hour to raise and bake at 350 F until golden brown. Let cool before cutting.

Cost for two loaves using mostly organic ingredients with links to Amazon:

4 cups organic white flour = 18 oz =$1.62
2.5 teaspoons yeast = 0.25 oz = $0.20
2 Tablespoons oil = 1 fl oz = $0.05
Salt, water, and electricity for baking = a few cents
TOTAL: Less than $1.00 per loaf

Comparable bread at the store is about $3.00-$4.00 per loaf. You can have added fun by putting rosemary, oregano, or suflower seeds in the dough. Unfortunately the child does not like anything added to her bread so we make it plain.

Cheese

This recipe is a mild modification of Lessarella cheez by GoDairyFree. The original recipe is probably better but it requires lemons and I often don’t have those around. Prices quoted for mostly organic ingredients with links to Amazon.

2 cups water (free)
2 Tablespoons apple cider vinegar (1 fl oz, $0.18)
1/2 cup nutritional yeast (8 Tbsp or $1.50)
1/3 cup quick oats ground to a powder ($0.20)
1/4 cup cornstarch (optional, makes cheese extra solid) ($0.35)
1 Tbsp onion powder ($0.25)
1/4 cup tahini ($0.86)
1 1/2 teaspoon salt

TOTAL cost: $3.34

Put all ingredients in a food processor (or use a submersible blender), blend until smooth (less than a minute) and then cook until thick (about 10 min). While cooking you really must stir THE WHOLE TIME. Freezes well. Great on sandwiches, pizza, quesadillas, and as dipping sauce for vegetables.

This “cheese” doesn’t really have a store bought equivalent but it fulfills all of our family’s cheese-needs for the week which used to take 3-4 packages of Dayia at $4.50 a bag and it is much less processed.

“Meat”

I don’t know why but it took me years to discover how easy it is to make seitan at home. This recipe is a modification of Seitan with Chickpea Flour from One Green Planet. Again, the original recipe is probably better but this has fewer ingredients so it is faster and cheaper.

Dry Ingredients
2 cups vital wheat gluten
1/2 cup chickpea flour
1/2 cup nutritional yeast
1 tablespoon dried basil
1 teaspoon cumin
1 tablespoon onion powder
Wet Ingredients
1 tablespoon ketchup
1/3 cup soy sauce
1 1/2 cups hot water

Mix all dry ingredients in a bowl. Separately, mix all the wet ingredients. Add the wet to the dry, mix, and kneed for 3-4 min. Add extra wheat gluten if needed. Let rest for 15 min covered with a towel. I usually form two “loaves” and I like to make them kind of long and thin (helps with cutting later). Put in a pot mostly covered with water with some soy sauce and boil for 1.5 hours. They will at least double in size so make sure they have enough space to do that. You may have to top off the water occasionally and you might want to flip the loaves half way through but they will be fine if you forget. You can also boil them in vegetable broth but I never do.

Cost for two loaves of seitan using mostly organic ingredients with links to Amazon:

2 cups vital wheat gluten ($1.95)
1/2 cup chickpea flour ($0.72)
1/2 cup nutritional yeast ($1.50)
1 Tbsp dried basil ($0.25)
1 teaspoon cumin ($0.25)
1 Tbsp onion powder ($0.25)
1 Tbsp ketchup ($0.25)
1/3 cup soy sauce ($0.60)

TOTAL: $5.77

You can add seitan slices to any meal or salad. We also eat it just as a snack thinly sliced. Store-bought seitan in about $4.00 for an 8 oz package in my area. I don’t have a scale but I think the recipe above makes at least 2 lb so that is about $16 if you bought it pre-made. Plus, it is really fun to make!

No Netflix November

No Snacks September was a fun challenge which led our family to adopt new eating habits. I thought November offered an interesting opportunity to explore life without Netflix. Maybe this will be another change we will decide to permanently embrace…

Netlfix for me is a lot like junk food. I spend a lot of time on Netflix to relax – it is essentially junk screen time. Given that my job requires me to be on the screen for probably 10 hours per day, I really don’t need any additional screen time. There are also many other screen activities that are more productive and more fun like writing this blog.

The average Netflix subscriber spends 1hr and 11 min per day on Netflix but only 35 min bonding with their family. I am afraid my stats are even worse than the average. Maybe No Netflix November will help me be a better wife and mother…

The Child does not approve of No Netflix November. For this reason, she has declined my invitation to provide art for this post. I am glad she has clear opinions and refuses to participate in activities that go against her believes:0)

A new gadget in the funky kitchen that is totally worth it

Artwork by The Child

I like my kitchen pretty empty. A few years ago, we donated most of our kitchen appliances and any extra pots and pans. We haven’t owned a mixer, a blender, or a food processor in awhile. These things occupied too much storage space, and they were too hard to clean, so we didn’t use them much. We also never got an instapot or an air fryer. We have a pot, several pans, a rice maker (when it breaks, I probably won’t replace it), and a toaster oven, and that seems to be all I need to make food. The toaster oven was a gift from my in-laws and is possibly the most used appliance in the house. I do most of my baking in it, and there are sweet potatoes roasting in it as I type. If you don’t have one of those, you probably need it!

The other appliance that I use a lot is a submersible blender. This was also a gift from my in-laws. It does most things a blender can do, but it is much smaller and doesn’t need counter space. I use it to cream soups, make vegan cheese, and even to make pancakes. About 6 months ago, it broke, and for a few months, I refused to replace it. I stopped making some things that required it, and I made my pancakes by hand (a little lumpy, but after baking, they tasted just fine). Finally, last month I decided that it is time to replace it and I found this wonderful gadget to replace it with

KOIOS 800W 4-in-1 Multifunctional Hand Immersion Blender

It turns out this is my dream gadget. The immersion blender works great. You can also use the motor to power a very basic food processor—just one blade, super easy to clean and store. I already made hummus and a salad dressing with it, and I love it. I am not so sure about the egg beater. I probably don’t really need that, but it might work as a mixer in a pinch.


If you already have a high-quality bender and a multifunctional food processor that shreds and grates and has a gazillion attachments, and you already have a mixer, then this gadget will be an inferior duplicate of what you already have. But if you don’t like cluttering your kitchen and you want one thing that will do most of the things you need relatively well, this is a gadget for you! $39.99 and no counter space needed.

Should you buy a Costco membership

Costco – the great warehouse store where your $120 membership gives you access to the wonders of 5lb jars of peanut butter and 8lb bottles of ketchup. Buying in bulk is cheaper, you get a back 2% of your spending at the end of the year, which usually covers your membership fee, so it is a great deal, right?


Well, not necessarily.

We had a Costco membership for several years, and we used it quite a lot. And yes, ketchup is cheaper per ounce than it is at our regular grocery store, and we did make up our membership fee in cash back at the end of the year. However, our grocery bill went up. “How is that possible if everything is cheaper?” you ask. Many of the things we bought were actually things we were never bought before, so we were not just replacing items we normally buy with cheaper alternatives, we were buying more stuff.


We bought only a few things at Costco that were actually a better deal on our normal purchases –I like their flour and their frozen fruit and vegetables and their toilet paper. The rest of our purchases were mostly snacks and pre-prepared foods and fancy water.


Costco has great snacks — large bags of popcorn, various chips, crackers, and cookies. They also have great soups, guacamole in single-serving containers (perfect for packed lunches), hummus, salsa, and naan. Costco bagels are better than those at most bakeries. And then there are the water and juice options. You will find the best deal on Izzy (our all-time favorite drink) at Costco. If you are going to eat all of those things, Costco is your store. However, all of those things added both to our grocery bill and my ever-expanding waistline. Not to mention the pounds of trash we added to landfills from all of those single-serving packages.

After NoSnack September, we discovered that life is better is you stick to the basic food groups, which for our family means fruits, veggies, and dried goods. Fresh fruit and veggies are not particularly great or particularly cheap at Costco. Our local coop often has the same or cheaper prices for organic produce that Costco has for conventional. I sometimes miss the packages of frozen broccoli we used to get at Costco. They are a great deal but certainly not worth the price of membership and the drive to the store. I pay a dollar more per pound at the coop and save a trip.


Costco does have good prices of bulk dried foods like chickpeas, lentils, rice, and flour. But it turns out Amazon comes pretty close. These items are easy to ship, and many producers, some of them Costco suppliers, sell their products directly to customers online. I don’t have to leave the house, and I have more choices.

Costco has great prices, but it also has many temptations. For now, I am staying out. The few dollars I could save are not worth the drive, and the risk I will walk out of there with 5 lbs of kettle corn. Someday, after the pandemic is over, I might ask a friend to take me to Costco a few times a year. There are also prepaid cards that you don’t need to be a member to use. Instead of rewarding you for spending more as membership does, these cards limit your ability to spend.


So, before you commit to Costco for the sake of saving a few dollars on 8 lbs of peanut butter, consider if you can really walk out of there just with the items you normally buy, if those few dollars are worth the trip, and if you even can, or should, eat 8 lbs of peanut butter before it goes bad.

No-Snacks September

As we noticed in our annual budget analysis, our family spends way more money on food than most households. That got me thinking if we are optimizing our happiness profits within this part of our budget which lead to me going over all of our food receipts from the past two months. We have been quarantining so all of our shopping since March has been through deliveries and therefore all of our itemized receipts are online. In fact, for July and August we have only shopped at two stores and I know for sure we didn’t do a quick trip for milk I have forgotten about so the data is very accurate. In total, for the two months, we spent $1,793 at the grocery store of which $128 was non-food items (mostly detergents and toilet paper) so we spent $1,664 on actual food. This is $832 a month, way lower than our average for 2019 ($1,231 per month) which is great. What is not so great is that 22% of the money we spent on groceries was spent on snacks! And that is the part of our food budget that is bringing our happiness profits down.

I put everything that is prepackaged processed carbs in this category. For our family, that is mostly cookies, chips, popcorn, and ice-cream. There were some frozen pre-prepared foods (pizza and fries) but the bulk of it was stuff that doesn’t even resemble actual food. So, what is the problem with snacks?

I like snacks too much. It takes too much willpower for me not to eat them when they are lying around. I know processed food is bad for me in all kinds of ways but grabbing a handful of chips is so much easier than figuring out something better to eat. And a bag of kettle corn is an easy replacement for an actual dinner and I can eat it while working.  

Snacks are bad for our family happiness as well. As I am writing this post, the child is apparently raiding the goldfish crackers stash and my wife is having her umpteenth discussion about what “foods” can and can’t be eaten before supper. If the child over-indulges in goldfish, later she’ll say she’s not hungry for supper and I will feel guilty that my child has had nothing but processed carbs all day.

So, it is clear that the $370 wasn’t money well spent. And I don’t do moderation well so my family is going on a no-snack challenge for the month of September. I am sure the child will be excited to hear this plan :0)

To make sure nobody actually starves, we will have to pair this challenge with some sort of plan for what we are going to eat once all the goldfish are gone. My wife is just starting work again after having most of the summer off and the child will be going to online school which means we’ll all be busy and the child will need a lot of attention from us throughout the day. So, our time to cook will be severely limited. I have read many blogs about the value of meal planning and meal prepping. This is supposed to be the ultimate answer to lowering your grocery bill and decreasing your time in the kitchen. And as we would like to achieve both, I will attempt to follow the wise advice of others this month and meal plan and maybe even meal prep. Reports of this adventure to appear in future posts! Stay tuned.

Our dog ate yeast! Advice I paid $60 for that I will give you for free

We have a beagle. A middle-aged, lazy, blind beagle named Flopsy for her tendency to flop and fall asleep anywhere. She is a calm, easy dog (she doesn’t even howl) except when it comes to food. She will engage in amazing feats of agility to get to food. In the first year we had her (we got her when she was already middle-aged and blind) she got into grapes twice. Grapes are bad for dogs. Both times we rushed her to the emergency vet where they emptied her stomach and my wallet. After the second time, we just decided that having grapes at the house is not worth it and we banned grapes and raisins from entering the house (FYI, a shocking percentage of cereal and breakfast bars have raisins). Dark chocolate only enters the house in small amount and is stored in the highest cupboard. Teabags are never left close to the edge of the counter. We all have a list of things toxic to dogs memorized and are always scanning for dangers hoping to prevent a Flopsy disaster.

Or at least I thought we all had the list memorized. I had never told me family about yeast. Usually, dogs ingest yeast when it is in raising dough. If they ingest enough of it, the dough continues to raise in their stomachs potentially causing bloat or other kinds of major trouble. But I am the only person in the house who bakes and I always keep track of my dough so I had never impressed upon my family the danger of yeast.

My lovely wife was cleaning the fridge and dropped an open yeast package. She picked it up but didn’t know yeast is bad for dogs so she didn’t check carefully that none of the yeast spilled. Our floor is light brown so yeast blends really well. Then she noticed the beagle was licking the floor where the yeast had dropped. She checked in with me if yeast is OK for dogs and I freaked out (that is what I do when an animal might be in trouble).

I called the emergency vet but the vet on duty had never encountered a dog eating plain yeast and referred me to the pet poison hotline. They were very good and sounded thorough and competent. They also cost $59.95 for the consultation. A very calm woman explained to me that if there is food in the stomach, the yeast begins to ferment releasing ethanol gas. You essentially end up with a drunk dog. If there is too much ethanol, that is very, very dangerous and does require immediate emergency care. Luckily, it was right before feeding time so Flopsy hadn’t eaten in 6 hours. We were instructed to monitor at home and not feed the dog until the next day. Our dog is 30 lb and my estimate was that she ate less than a teaspoonful. If you have a smaller dog, a dog who ate more than a teaspoonful of yeast, or a dog who has recently had food, this is a vet emergency.

So, today’s money saving tip – double bag your yeast! It can save you thousands in vet costs! Here is a list of all the other things to watch out for if you have pets.