Contemplating becoming a single income household

Artwork by The Child

Funky Wife is a special ed teacher. In normal times, she mostly works one-on-one with students, sitting right by them, sharing pencils, and exchanging pieces of paper. Many of her students also have behavior issues making them more likely to defy rules or engage in impulsive behavior. This trimester she is working online, but it looks like that might not be an option for the following trimester. We hope she can stay employed part-time and continue to work from home, but there is a chance she will have to take a leave without pay.


We briefly considered the possibility of her actually going back to the classroom. There haven’t been many cases at her school. On the other hand, the schools in my county have only been open for in-person learning for a few weeks, and cases both nationally and in our state are going up, so there is no reason to believe that cases at the schools won’t go up as well. So, I think we have decided that her going to work in-person is not a risk we want to take.
The question of whether schools should be open for in-person learning is a thorny one. I fully realize that many kids do not learn nearly as much during online learning as they do in an actual classroom. Most of the learning The Child is doing happens with a parent sitting by her. I know there are many parents who either don’t have the time or the knowledge necessary to educate their kids. I also know that kids growing up in poverty are at a huge disadvantage, which compounds all the other disadvantages they have. And I know that most kids would be fine even if they get the virus.


On the other hand, both the students’ families and the teachers and their families may not be fine if they get the virus. And here again, poor students are at a disadvantage. They are more likely to live in multigenerational homes or to be cared for by grandparents, and their families are more likely to have preexisting conditions. Overall, I think a student is better off falling behind in math because they did online school for a year than losing their caregiver to the virus.


Teachers also didn’t sign up to be front line workers. A doctor or a policeman knows that they are embarking on a career that could put them in high-risk situations. A teacher doesn’t expect that to be part of their job. The same is true of paraeducators who often get paid just above minimum wage. Of course, this is also true of many other jobs which have suddenly become high-risk without a proportionate increase in pay.


So, back to our family. I don’t know what kind of choices we would have made if we didn’t have The Child, but at this time, I feel that our primary obligation is to her, and she needs her parents. Therefore, Funky Wife will not be returning to in-person work, and we will almost certainly experience a drop in income. Luckily, we already live on significantly less than we make, so our day-to-day life won’t have to change much. Also, we have enough savings that even if we have unexpected expenses during our single-income period, we should be able to manage.


Funky Wife enjoys her job, and I think she will be a little bit sad if she can’t work. For both of us, our jobs are much more than a source of income. Funky Wife loves to help students, especially the students that most people have given up on. She likes her colleagues, and she thrives on human interaction. She also knows that if she is not working, many household chores will fall on her, and she doesn’t like housework nearly as much as I like housework. So her not working is really not ideal, but at this point, we are grateful that we have this option. I feel terrible for people who feel that they need to go to work even though they are scared so they can pay their bills.

Money can seem really complicated. There are lots of books and blogs about investing, tax optimization, appropriate leveraging, etc. But there is actually only one lesson I want The Child to learn about money – live on less than you make! When you do that, you never go into debt, and your savings are always growing. When you are debt-free and have savings, you have many more choices about how you live your life, and that is much more valuable than anything money can buy.

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